Current Fellows

Congratulations to our 2019 Fellows:

  • Aska (WA)
  • Rachel Gregg (NSW)
  • Pip Harry (Singapore)
  • Jackie Hosking (Vic)
  • Caroline Magerl (Qld)
  • Sally Murphy (WA)
  • Kate O’Donnell (Vic)
  • Shivaun Plozza (Vic)
  • Sue Whiting (NSW)


 

We will welcome Aska, Rachel Gregg, Caroline Magerl, Kate O’Donnell and Sue Whiting to Adelaide.

 

Aska is both an illustrator and scientist. She has illustrated eight books, and is a regular illustrator for The School Magazine and other children’s publications. She also works for the West Australian Science centre, and travels across the state to deliver shows and workshops to primary schools. Aska’s fellowship project in Adelaide will be the development of one of her own story telling projects. She will work on a picture book for readers aged six to twelve, which will use the language of graphic novels, such as panels and speech bubbles. The reader will be introduced to a world much like our own, through the central character Rusty, who lives in a mundane environment filled with escapist, high-tech entertainment. However, a chance discovery leads Rusty to learn a startling truth, igniting interest in the world around us.

Through this story, Aska aims to communicate complex ideas about what makes us human and to develop the curiosity that is at the heart of scientific inquiry.

 

Rachel Gregg is the third Ian Wilson Memorial Fellow. She is an illustrator from regional New South Wales who will use the time and space provided by the fellowship to work on her picture book, Nana Jacaranda, which will explore grief and loss through the variety of trees in the Australian landscape. The Ian Wilson Memorial Fellowship also includes professional development for Rachel, and she will be able to take advantage of the Trust’s network of writers, publishers, schools, libraries and local professional associations.

Caroline Magerl is a picture book author/illustrator, based the Sunshine Coast. Her big break came in 2001 when she illustrated Grandma’s Shoes, winning the Crichton Award for new illustrators. Caroline has since won several awards, including for her first book as an author-illustrator, Rose and the Wish Thing. Caroline will spend her time in Adelaide working on a new picture book for 3-7 year olds, Piano Fingers, which centres on a young girl's journey learning to play a musical instrument. The story will be told in her signature magical realist writing style, with unique line and wash illustrations. 

Kate O’Donnell is a writer, editor and bookseller specialising in children’s and young adult literature. Her first novel, Untidy Towns, was published in 2017, and her second is due for publication in early 2020. Kate will spend her residency drafting a new contemporary young adult novel, which will explore themes of decay and renewal, despair and hope, as well as innocence and the loss of innocence. The overarching storyline will focus on community, government mismanagement and environmental sustainability.

Sue Whiting has written numerous books in a variety of both fiction and non-fiction genres, from picture books to YA. These include the best-selling The Firefighters and award-winning A Swim in the Sea. Sue’s project for her fellowship is the research, planning and commencement of the first draft of Any Day Now, for readers aged 9-12, set in Adelaide in the early 1900s. This historical novel will tell the story of ten-year-old orphan Tilly, who refuses to believe that her father has abandoned her. The action takes place against the backdrop of the Boer War, the coming of Federation and the impact of the suffrage movement.

 

Shivaun Plozza and Pip Harry will undertake their fellowships in Brisbane.

 

Shivaun Plozza is an award-winning Children’s and YA writer. Her critically acclaimed debut novel, Frankie, was a CBCA Notable Book, shortlisted for the Inky Awards, Highly Commended at the Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards and won the YA category of the Davitt Awards. Her second novel, Tin Heart, was released in March 2018. Shivaun is also the author of many published short stories. Shivaun will use her creative time to draft a new YA contemporary realism/speculative fiction crossover for readers aged 14 and over, which will explore the impact of anxiety disorder on a quiet seventeen-year-old girl.

 

Pip Harry is an Australian author, currently living and working in Singapore. She has published three young adult novels in Australia: I'll Tell You Mine, Head of the River, and Because of You. Pip will spend her time in Brisbane to research and draft a new young adult novel set in Australia and Singapore for readers 13-18. This work will tell the stories of a recently arrived Australian schoolgirl from a small NSW coastal town and an Indian-Singaporean schoolboy facing compulsory military service.

 

Jackie Hosking and Sally Murphy will travel to Canberra for their creative time residencies.

 

Jackie Hosking is a Nigerian born, Cornish Australian poet who lives on the Surf Coast of Victoria. Jackie’s first picture book, The Croc and the Platypus, was published in 2014 and is being rereleased in 2019. Jackie will use her fellowship time to polish Road Trip, her second picture book, as well as writing and honing poems and other picture book texts. Road Trip is a story written in rhyming verse about a family who travel, clockwise, around Australia, beginning and ending in Victoria, visiting two famous places in each state.

 

Sally Murphy is a children’s author and poet from rural Western Australia. Her works include the award-winning verse novels Pearl Verses the World, Toppling and Roses are Blue, as well as novels, picture books, poetry and more. Sally will use her time in Canberra to draft a new chapter book for 8-10 year olds. She also aims to revisit poetry she has written in the last year during visits to Europe and Vietnam, as well as several picture book manuscripts.

 

2019 Fellows (L to R):

Aska (WA), Rachel Gregg (NSW), Pip Harry (Singapore), Jackie Hosking (Vic), Caroline Magerl (Qld), Sally Murphy (WA), Kate O'Donnell (Vic), Shivaun Plozza (Vic), Sue Whiting (NSW)